1.6
4 reviews
33

A-Bike Folding Bicycle


$300.00

Product Shot 1 The Pros:Folds into a portable shape. Folding is easy with the telescopic system.

The Cons:Wheels are extremely small. Can't hold much weight. Works properly only on extremely smooth terrain.

The A-Bike is a folding bike that weighs only 12 pounds and folds into a compact 26" x 11" x 6" (67cm x 30cm x 16cm). The bike rides like a normal bicycle, although the lightweight nature of the bike sometimes takes some getting used to.

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Product Shot 2 The folding is done using a 3-click telescopic mechanism, making it easy to fold and unfold without any tools.

Features

  • 2 chain system encased in an enclosure (with ratios 14:8 and 35:9)
  • 1 gear
  • Rider specifications: 4'9" to 6'3" and up to 185 lbs.
  • Tire diameter: 6"
  • Frame is made from heat treated aluminum

Note: The Strida 3.2 Folding bike holds up to 250 lbs.

Invented by Sir Clive Sinclair "..the idea is that if you have a bicycle which is seriously lighter and more compact than anything existing at the moment, it will change the way in which people see bikes.” "...it's so well built it could have been machined in a Formula One factory .. this is the ipod of bicycles, a fantastic feat of engineering.." Time Out Magazine November 2006

User Reviews (4)

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Add Pros & Cons
33
ProScore
Pros
  • 1

    Folds into a portable shape

  • 1

    Folding is easy with the telescopic system

Cons
  • 2

    Wheels are extremely small

  • 1

    Can't hold much weight

  • 1

    Works properly only on extremely smooth terrain

  • 0

    Frame flexes while being ridden

  • -2

    Evident that the designer was not a cyclist. This is a bad thing.

Comments (3)

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Dornier
Dornier: #a_bike_folding_bicycle The problem with this machine is that on close inspection, one can see that it is not actually a bike. It is what some cyclists call a BSO (Bike Shaped Object). I'm sure it's very portable, but when they were designing the riding qualities, all the cyclists were sent out of the room. Dec 22, 09
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dannykutner
dannykutner: #a_bike_folding_bicycle Light. Not to be taken lightly...Buyer beware.

This is a cross between a Totes umbrella and a bicycle. It is good at neither carrying people safely, nor at keeping people dry in the rain.

Its top speed is about half that of conventional bikes and well below that of the Strida. It is tiresome to ride uphill, but very easy to push (at 5 kg). If it was safe, such defects would be excusable; after all, it is so small and compact and fun that it fills a void. You cannot take a Strida on a crowded bus without bothering other passengers, but this tucks away neatly.

While getting used to the bike's balance, it is fairly easy to slide off the back (as can be seen in the video comparing this bike to the Strida, here: http://fr.youtube.com/watch?v=kVVgsQt1DK4).

After about a week on the bike, I had a serious accident. The front telescoping support collapsed under me, pulling my hands and arms down. I landed on my (helmeted) head. Result: compressed vertibrae, cracked rib, a week in the hospital.

Needless to say, if such an accident happens in traffic, the result will be pat? de cycliste.

While I cannot be sure whether I secured the quick-release latch before I took the bike, I believe I did. In any event, it is relatively easy for the rider to forget to do so and still to use the bike, and a failure (such as the one I experienced) could be very, very serious.

The manufacturer issues warnings. It notes that it is necessary to tighten all bolts and fasteners. This is especially true on this bike. Like every fourth ride or so. Not to be taken lightly. Apr 5, 08
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gillsavage
gillsavage: #a_bike_folding_bicycle Second time i used this up a hill the bike's front wheel came up and I fell back on the road banging my head and bruising my self quite badly - anyone out there feel the same way as me I question the safety of this bike Jul 21, 07
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